Author Archives: Janine Lim

Strategies to Assist Distance Doctoral Students in Completing Their Dissertations

My colleagues and I recently published an article on distance doctoral students in The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning. It’s a Field Notes article, with practices from our experience shared.

Lim, J., Covrig, D., Freed, S., De Oliveira, B., Ongo , M., & Newman, I. (2019). Strategies to assist distance doctoral students in completing their dissertationsThe International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning20(5), 192-210. https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v20i5.4532

Strategies for Three Goals

In the paper, we share strategies and technology tools that meet the following three goals:

  1. cultivate a shared culture of responsibility and commitment
    • a tool to discuss the distance doctoral student’s social network
    • teaching students how to manage their split life
    • a tool to evaluate the student’s readiness for the dissertation process
    • mapping out where dissertation skills are developed in the program
  2. increase effective communication between researchers
    • being available to students
    • giving effective feedback
    • generating trust
    • using humor
  3. grow departmental and institutional services and technologies for faculty and students
    1. the use of online and library resources
    2. campus-wide use of research software
    3. writing retreats
    4. departmental support for research

If these areas are of interest to you in supporting online doctoral students, I encourage you to take a look at our article. It’s open access, so please enjoy!

Book Review: Ecologies of faith in a digital age: Spiritual growth through online education

Recently I had a book review published with the Journal of Research on Christian Education. You can read the full review through your library.

Ecologies of Faith in a Digital Age: Spiritual Growth through Online Education by [Lowe, Stephen D., Lowe, Mary E.]

The book is available through Amazon as a Kindle version or paperback.

I highly recommend that you read the book, particularly if you’re involved in faith-based online education. The book sparked some interesting questions to think about:

  1. What are some examples in the Bible of using nature/creation as an illustration for spiritual growth?
  2. What lessons can we extract from those illustrations in the Bible of what a digital environment should be like in order to support spiritual growth?
  3. What are some ways to do the “one another” phrases from Paul’s writings – together online? i.e. “build up one another”, “comfort one another” as as few examples.

Here’s a snippet of my book review to inspire you:

Lowe and Lowe argue that the natural is not just a metaphor for the spiritual; that Scripture does not support Plato’s division between the natural and the spiritual. God’s methods of gardening are evident both in the natural world and in our spiritual growth and are “identical” between them (p. 41). The proper spiritual ecology will provide the “requisite spiritual nutrients” for growth (p. 48) and several chapters go in depth exploring kingdom growth as described in the Bible using plant ecology and the human body ecosystem (Paul). As Christians, we are expected to “mutually assist each other” (p. 66) even in digital ecologies. As I have personally experienced, and heard others describe, the work of the Holy Spirit connects believers across distance (p. 73). As Lowe and Lowe argue, critics of online community seem to “contradict orthodox Christian theology” regarding the “communion believers enjoy with Christ through the Spirit” (p. 73) by suggesting that community cannot happen online. Lowe and Lowe make the Scriptural case that in fact, Biblical spiritual growth can happen at a distance through the work of the Holy Spirit.

Lim, J. (2019). Book review: Ecologies of faith in a digital age: Spiritual growth through online education. Journal of Research on Christian Education, 28(1), 84-87, doi: 10.1080/10656219.2019.1593009

Your Turn

  • What challenges do you face in faith-based online learning?
  • What do you think we can learn from Paul, as one of the first distance missionaries (think of all his letters as distance education)?
  • What have we learned from research on online communities that connects to spiritual growth online?

Feel free to comment!

Book Published: Adventist Online Education: Realizing the Potential

book cover

I’m excited to announce the publication of a new book! Adventist Online Education: Realizing the Potential. It is a collection of research papers presented at the 2017 Adventist Online Learning Conference, edited by yours truly and Anthony Williams.

I encourage you to check out the book. Hopefully you will find it useful in your online learning work. Below you can find the description from the back of the book.

This collection of research by Adventist online educators will be useful to many online educators, including those interested in the intersection of faith and online learning, and online learning in faith communities. This research spans four major areas of online delivery:

(1) the pursuit of Adventist distinctiveness and the Adventist experience within online delivery, applicable to all those considering the connection between the mission of an institution and it’s online delivery;
(2) the empowering and enabling of students, staff, and faculty for advising, monitoring, and resourcing quality online experiences;
(3) the power of technology to support collaboration among our institutions, our faculty, our teams; and
(4) the supports, training, and methods needed for the effectiveness of online delivery.

If you are an administrator, online program director, or teach in an online program, this book will serve as a professional resource that can help ensure that programs offered effectively meet the needs of students while supporting and extending the school’s mission. 

20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement

This blog post accompanies my session, 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement, presented at the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Philippines.

PPT: 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student EngagementN















Note that I have deliberately not included tons of sites and ideas because I wanted this to be simple and not too overwhelming. To pique interest.

Learn about Designing Significant Learning Experiences

Learning How to Learn

  • Evaluating and selecting content sources, i.e. YouTubeTedEd, books!
  • Teach students to subscribe to the journal’s feeds i.e. ALT or Community of Inquiry
  • Using project based learning and makerspaces for student-designed projects
  • Teach students to monitor their own understanding (print flashcards, Quizlet), and mind map knowledge, identifying areas to learn more, selecting and pursuing
  • Reflection on their own blog, like UMW does with A Domain of One’s One
  • Showcasing and extending learning with job portfolios: i.e. via Mahara or other portfolio tools

Caring

Human Dimension

  • Blog or discuss ways in which one’s personal life affects and is affected by the subject via WordPressVoiceThreadWeeblyEdublogs.
  • Be an ethical, responsible member of a team serving others; tools to support groups: GoogleDrive and similar tools to support collaborative learning.
  • Observation of real-life human experiences related to the content; report back to the class.

Integration

Application

  • Analyze and critique an issue or case study, and organize and present it via Padlet.
  • Apply the skills in context; document ability with video via YouTubeVideoscribeFlipGrid, or Animoto.
  • Create a recommendation for a corporation in a real-world problem/situation, build and present on GoogleSites or PowToon.

Foundational Knowledge

  • Create and share/narrate a mental map or conceptual structure of major concepts. Bubbl.us or Mindly the app or MindMeister.
  • Create a presentation: Explain & predict concepts and ideas. i.e. Prezi
  • Have students access and interact with primary sources of content – i.e. TedEdLibrary of Congress, and more.

Online Tools and References

Fink Taxonomy and Tools v2 PDF Handout – Permission granted to reprint freely. Please share any adaptations.

What would you add? Feel free to comment and share. 

Issues of Intellectual Property

This post supports a workshop I am presenting to the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies in Silang, Philippines.

Resources for group activities:

Group 1: Biblical Guidance

  • What Biblical guidance do we have for the topic of intellectual property and copyright? Here are two verses to get you started:
    • Leviticus 19:13
    • Matthew 10:8
  • Bible Gateway

Group 2: Copyright of Other’s Materials

Group 3: My Intellectual Property

Group 4: Copyleft

Group 5: Creative Commons

Group 6: OER: Open Educational Resources

Sample Copyright and Intellectual Property Policies

  • Policies are needed for: faculty-created content, student’s use of copyrighted content created by faculty, all faculty and staff use of copyrighted content
  • Andrews University Working Policy section 2:383
    • See also Section 1:762:5
    • Andrews University statement at the bottom of all Moodle pages (scroll to the bottom)
    • Online course contract ownership language options:
      • Ownership of Products: The Course Author understands that this course manuscript and all accompanying materials are work made for hire and shall belong exclusively to Andrews University. Andrews University owns all rights and interests in the course for initial and all subsequent publications. Andrews University reserves the right to utilize other Course Authors to edit, revise, or reconstruct the course. The Course Author understands that s/he is not authorized to share or sell or disclose any portions of the course to any entity or individual at any time during its development, upon termination of the agreement, or after the project is completed.
      • Ownership of Products: The Course Author understands that this course manuscript and all accompanying materials are work made for hire and shall belong exclusively to Andrews University. Andrews University owns all rights and interests in the course for initial and all subsequent publications of the course. Andrews University reserves the right to utilize other authors to edit, revise, or reconstruct the course, as needed. However, the author may use the materials for purposes of his or her own instruction in the classroom or to adapt for publication in another form.
  • Please also search other institutions to benchmark. For example, search “university name intellectual property policy”.

Gifts of Collaboration

This blog post accompanies my session, Gifts of Collaboration, presented for the AIIAS Academy faculty, Silang, Philippines.

A few recommended blog posts regarding collaboration

COIL: Collaborative Online International Learning

COIL is the higher ed version of what the videoconference projects I was heavily involved in till 2011. Read more from my recent attendance at a COIL Conference where I made connections between the two:

K12 Collaboration Examples Shared

Bibliography

  • Cifuentes, L., & Murphy, K. L. (2000). Promoting multicultural understanding and positive self-concept through a distance learning community: cultural connections. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(1), 69-83.
  • Martinez, M. D., & MacMillan, G. (1998). A Joint Distance Learning Course in American Government (No. ED428005).
  • Owston, R. (2007). Contextual factors that sustain innovative pedagogical practice using technology: an international study. Journal of Educational Change, 8(1), 61-77.
  • Sweeney, M. A. (2007). The use of videoconferencing techniques which support constructivism in K-12 education. Dissertation Abstracts International.
  • Warschauer, M. (1997).Computer-mediated collaborative learning: Theory and practice. Modern Language Journal, 81(3), p. 470-481. Also at http://www.gse.uci.edu/person/markw/cmcl.html
  • Yost, N. (2001). Lights, Camera, Action: Videoconferencing in Kindergarten. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference.
  • For more videoconferencing related literature, see my research and dissertation.

Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection with Creative Professional Learning Models

This blog post accompanies my session, Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection with Creative Professional Learning Models, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

PPT: Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection

Models of Online Professional Learning

Scaffolding for Success with Large Scale

  • Cheat sheets: simple instructions with screen shots for each tool used
  • Phone numbers: who to call? tiered level of support
  • Facilitators for large groups
  • Mechanism for smalls schools to interact
  • PDF agenda, resources, instructions, handbook. Printed ahead of time.

Additional Resources

Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning: Practical Strategies & Ideas

This blog post accompanies my session, Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning: Practical Strategies & Ideas, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

PPT: Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning

Definitions

Personalized Learning

  • KnowledgeWorks: What is Personalized Learning?
  • Lim, J. (2016). Predicting successful completion using student delay indicators in undergraduate self-paced online courses. Distance Education, 37(3) , 317-332. doi:10.1080/01587919.2016.1233050
  • Lim, J. (2016). The relationship between successful completion and sequential movement in self-paced distance courses. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(1). Retrieved from http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/2167
  • Self-Directed Learning Habits
  • 4 Steps to Successful Self-Directed Learning (from a university center of teaching)
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • Lin Hsiao, J. W. D. (1998). The impact of reflective facilitation on middle school students’ self-regulated learning and their academic achievement in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. (Ph.D.), The University of Texas at Austin, United States — Texas. ProQuest Digital Dissertation database.
  • Mager, R. F., & Clark, C. (1963). Explorations in student-controlled instruction. Psychological Reports, 13(1), 71-76.
  • Panadero, E. (2017). A review of self-regulated learning: Six models and four directions for research. Frontiers in Psychology8, 422. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00422
  • Schraw, G., Crippen, K., & Hartley, K. (2006). Promoting self-regulation in science education: Metacognition as part of a broader perspective on learning. Research in Science Education, 36, 111-139. Retrieved from  doi:10.1007/s11165-005-3917-8

Video Resources

Open Courses and Resources

Recording and Hosting Videos

Assessments at the Door

Resources for Teaching, Active Learning, and Engagement

Accessibility

For Further Reading

Additional Resources

20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement

This blog post accompanies my session, 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Updated PPT: 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement (updated 8/8/18)

Note: 8/8/18 Additional links added to Learning how to Learn; and Caring

 

 

Note that I have deliberately not included tons of sites and ideas because I wanted this to be simple and not too overwhelming. To pique interest.

Learn about Designing Significant Learning Experiences

Learning How to Learn

  • Evaluating and selecting content sources, i.e. YouTube, TedEd, books!
  • Teach students to subscribe to the journal’s feeds i.e. ALT or Community of Inquiry
  • Using project based learning and makerspaces for student-designed projects
  • Teach students to monitor their own understanding (print flashcards, Quizlet), and mind map knowledge, identifying areas to learn more, selecting and pursuing
  • Reflection on their own blog, like UMW does with A Domain of One’s One
  • Showcasing and extending learning with job portfolios: i.e. via Mahara or other portfolio tools

Caring

Human Dimension

  • Blog or discuss ways in which one’s personal life affects and is affected by the subject via WordPress, VoiceThread, Weebly, Edublogs.
  • Be an ethical, responsible member of a team serving others; tools to support groups: GoogleDrive and similar tools to support collaborative learning.
  • Observation of real-life human experiences related to the content; report back to the class.

Integration

Application

  • Analyze and critique an issue or case study, and organize and present it via Padlet.
  • Apply the skills in context; document ability with video via YouTube, Videoscribe, FlipGrid, or Animoto.
  • Create a recommendation for a corporation in a real-world problem/situation, build and present on GoogleSites or PowToon.

Foundational Knowledge

  • Create and share/narrate a mental map or conceptual structure of major concepts. Bubbl.us or Mindly the app or MindMeister.
  • Create a presentation: Explain & predict concepts and ideas. i.e. Prezi
  • Have students access and interact with primary sources of content – i.e. TedEd, Library of Congress, and more.

Online Tools and References

Fink Taxonomy and Tools v2 PDF Handout – Permission granted to reprint freely. Please share any adaptations.

What would you add? Feel free to comment and share. 

 

Videoconferencing in the Real World: Wikispaces Archive

Since Wikispaces is closing down, I’m moving my collaborative videoconference projects over to my blog for archiving. Great project formats can still be used and adapted!

Videoconferencing in the Real World: A Computer Class Jigaw Project

Description: This project by Berrien RESA, is designed for 6-12th grade students studying computer technology. Students will use computer technology and distance learning to research revolutionary uses of videoconferencing in society. Students will present their research and their own innovative ideas to partner schools from around the globe.

Flyer: VCintheRealWorldFlyer09

VC Agenda

  • Brief introduction of school and projects
  • Groups introduce topic and present
  • Each presentation will include a two minute question and answer period
  • Teachers may choose to alternate presentations from school to school after every other group
  • Students may experiment with videoconference equipment
  • After all presentations and question/answer periods, students may engage in a general “getting to know you” question and answer session with their partner school

How To

Creating Posters for Videoconferencing

This VC Poster Handout for students gives simple tips for clear presentations via posters.

PowerPoint Tips

  • Use a large font.
  • Don’t put too much text on the page.
  • Don’t use red for background or text.
  • Have a good contrast between text and background.
  • Blue backgrounds with white or yellow text work best.

Preparation

  • Choose which sets you would like your students to work on
  • Divide the class into one group for each topic
  • Students will use the internet and other sources to research the following:
    • Uses of videoconferencing in their assigned area
    • Types of equipment and skills required to use videoconferencing in this area
    • Advantages and disadvantages of videoconferencing use in this area
    • Impact on environment, interpersonal skills, employment, etc.
    • Optional: Students may also add their personal opinion of videoconferencing as it relates to the above topics
  • Assign student jobs for the videoconference.
    • Have a couple students ready to introduce your class and welcome the partner class.
    • Have a couple students assigned to facilitate asking and answering questions with the partner class.

Procedures

  • Students will organize their research onto no more than 10 Power Point slides
    • Keep in mind that each group is only allotted 2-3 minutes; have students practice their presentations for fluidity, adherence to the time limit, and to answer mock questions partner schools may ask about their presentation.
    • Students should also prepare questions for their partner school’s presentations

Materials

  • Adequate access to computers with internet access and Power Point or similar tool
  • Supplementary resources
    • encyclopedias, magazine or newspaper articles, media clippings, etc.
    • Art supplies (poster paper, coloring materials, glue, etc.)

Resources for Both Classes

Note: I am not maintaining these links. They are here for reference and history only.

General Videoconferencing Information


Resources for Class A

Classroom A: Four Groups

Students: Remember your presentation cannot be longer than 3 minutes!!!

Group 1 Military Uses of VC

Group 2 Healthcare Uses of VC

Group 3 Business Uses of VC

Group 4 Dream Team
Students create a unique way to use videoconferencing that was not presented by other groups. Use your imagination and think about how videoconferencing may be used in in daily life, school, home, business, etc.

 


Resources for Class B

Classroom B: Four Groups

Group 1 Educational Uses of VC

Group 2 Uses of VC in the Judicial, Legal Systems and Public Safety

Group 3 Creative Uses of VC and Green Videoconferencing

Group 4 TV Shows, Movies and Ads
Students research and demonstrate the integration of videoconferencing in television shows, movies and commercials. Students may chose from a variety of creative formats to present their findings including skits, slide shows, video clips, etc. Reference the following link for examples:

  • Cisco TV Ads
  • Watch your favorite TV show(s) and notice if videoconferencing is used.

Standards

ISTE Standard: Communication and Collaboration
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:

  • interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.

Michigan Educational Technology Standards (METS for 6-8)

Main Standards:

  • Technology Communication Tools #1: use a variety of telecommunication tools (e.g., e-mail, discussion groups, IM, chat rooms, blogs, video-conferences, web
    conferences) or other online resources to collaborate interactively with peers, experts, and other audiences
  • Technology Communication Tools #2: create a project (e.g., presentation, web page, newsletter, information brochure) using a variety of media and formats
    (e.g., graphs, charts, audio, graphics, video) to present content information to an audience

Others also addressed:

  • Basic Operations #10: Identify technology resources that assist with various consumer-related activities (e.g., budgets, purchases, banking
    transactions, product descriptions)
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #5: discuss the societal impact of technology in the future
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #8: discuss possible uses of technology (present and future) to support personal pursuits and lifelong learning
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #9: identify uses of technology to support communication with peers, family, or school personnel
  • Technology Productivity Tools #2: use a variety of technology resources, including the internet, to increase learning and productivity
  • Technology Productivity Tools #3: explore basic applications that promote creativity (e.g., graphics, presentation, photo-editing, programming, video-editing)
  • Technology Research Tools #1: use a variety of Web search engines to locate information
  • Technology Research Tools #2: evaluate information from various online resources for accuracy, bias, appropriateness, and comprehensiveness

Facilitator Page

Email Confirmation Template

To: Teachers & techs on both sides, cc janine
Subject: VC in the Real World Project Confirmation: [date]

Welcome to our VC in the Real World project. The goals of this project are for your students to research and learn about videoconferencing, and experience presenting and interacting in a videoconference session.

DATE: [enter here]
TIME: [include time in both partner’s time zones]

Technical Information:
[who] will dial.
[IP address]
If there are problems, please call [phone].

Project Website:
Please visit the website for preparation information and web resources for your students to use in preparation.
http://vcinrealworld.wikispaces.com/

VC Agenda (sessions will be moderated by [name])

  1. Brief introduction of school and projects
  2. Groups introduce topic and present
  3. Each presentation will include a two minute question and answer period
  4. Teachers may choose to alternate presentations from school to school after every other group
  5. Students may experiment with videoconference equipment (presets, muting and unmuting, moving the camera, using the document camera)
  6. After all presentations and question/answer periods, students may engage in a general “getting to know you” question and answer session with their partner school

PARTNERS:
Classroom A:
[teacher name] [grade]
[school name, city, state]

Classroom B:
[teacher name] [grade]
[school name, city, state]

If you have any questions as you prepare for the videoconference, please email.

Thank you for your participation!