Author Archives: Janine Lim

Book Published: Adventist Online Education: Realizing the Potential

book cover

I’m excited to announce the publication of a new book! Adventist Online Education: Realizing the Potential. It is a collection of research papers presented at the 2017 Adventist Online Learning Conference, edited by yours truly and Anthony Williams.

I encourage you to check out the book. Hopefully you will find it useful in your online learning work. Below you can find the description from the back of the book.

This collection of research by Adventist online educators will be useful to many online educators, including those interested in the intersection of faith and online learning, and online learning in faith communities. This research spans four major areas of online delivery:

(1) the pursuit of Adventist distinctiveness and the Adventist experience within online delivery, applicable to all those considering the connection between the mission of an institution and it’s online delivery;
(2) the empowering and enabling of students, staff, and faculty for advising, monitoring, and resourcing quality online experiences;
(3) the power of technology to support collaboration among our institutions, our faculty, our teams; and
(4) the supports, training, and methods needed for the effectiveness of online delivery.

If you are an administrator, online program director, or teach in an online program, this book will serve as a professional resource that can help ensure that programs offered effectively meet the needs of students while supporting and extending the school’s mission. 

20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement

This blog post accompanies my session, 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement, presented at the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies, Silang, Philippines.

PPT: 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student EngagementN















Note that I have deliberately not included tons of sites and ideas because I wanted this to be simple and not too overwhelming. To pique interest.

Learn about Designing Significant Learning Experiences

Learning How to Learn

  • Evaluating and selecting content sources, i.e. YouTubeTedEd, books!
  • Teach students to subscribe to the journal’s feeds i.e. ALT or Community of Inquiry
  • Using project based learning and makerspaces for student-designed projects
  • Teach students to monitor their own understanding (print flashcards, Quizlet), and mind map knowledge, identifying areas to learn more, selecting and pursuing
  • Reflection on their own blog, like UMW does with A Domain of One’s One
  • Showcasing and extending learning with job portfolios: i.e. via Mahara or other portfolio tools

Caring

Human Dimension

  • Blog or discuss ways in which one’s personal life affects and is affected by the subject via WordPressVoiceThreadWeeblyEdublogs.
  • Be an ethical, responsible member of a team serving others; tools to support groups: GoogleDrive and similar tools to support collaborative learning.
  • Observation of real-life human experiences related to the content; report back to the class.

Integration

Application

  • Analyze and critique an issue or case study, and organize and present it via Padlet.
  • Apply the skills in context; document ability with video via YouTubeVideoscribeFlipGrid, or Animoto.
  • Create a recommendation for a corporation in a real-world problem/situation, build and present on GoogleSites or PowToon.

Foundational Knowledge

  • Create and share/narrate a mental map or conceptual structure of major concepts. Bubbl.us or Mindly the app or MindMeister.
  • Create a presentation: Explain & predict concepts and ideas. i.e. Prezi
  • Have students access and interact with primary sources of content – i.e. TedEdLibrary of Congress, and more.

Online Tools and References

Fink Taxonomy and Tools v2 PDF Handout – Permission granted to reprint freely. Please share any adaptations.

What would you add? Feel free to comment and share. 

Issues of Intellectual Property

This post supports a workshop I am presenting to the Adventist International Institute of Advanced Studies in Silang, Philippines.

Resources for group activities:

Group 1: Biblical Guidance

  • What Biblical guidance do we have for the topic of intellectual property and copyright? Here are two verses to get you started:
    • Leviticus 19:13
    • Matthew 10:8
  • Bible Gateway

Group 2: Copyright of Other’s Materials

Group 3: My Intellectual Property

Group 4: Copyleft

Group 5: Creative Commons

Group 6: OER: Open Educational Resources

Sample Copyright and Intellectual Property Policies

  • Policies are needed for: faculty-created content, student’s use of copyrighted content created by faculty, all faculty and staff use of copyrighted content
  • Andrews University Working Policy section 2:383
    • See also Section 1:762:5
    • Andrews University statement at the bottom of all Moodle pages (scroll to the bottom)
    • Online course contract ownership language options:
      • Ownership of Products: The Course Author understands that this course manuscript and all accompanying materials are work made for hire and shall belong exclusively to Andrews University. Andrews University owns all rights and interests in the course for initial and all subsequent publications. Andrews University reserves the right to utilize other Course Authors to edit, revise, or reconstruct the course. The Course Author understands that s/he is not authorized to share or sell or disclose any portions of the course to any entity or individual at any time during its development, upon termination of the agreement, or after the project is completed.
      • Ownership of Products: The Course Author understands that this course manuscript and all accompanying materials are work made for hire and shall belong exclusively to Andrews University. Andrews University owns all rights and interests in the course for initial and all subsequent publications of the course. Andrews University reserves the right to utilize other authors to edit, revise, or reconstruct the course, as needed. However, the author may use the materials for purposes of his or her own instruction in the classroom or to adapt for publication in another form.
  • Please also search other institutions to benchmark. For example, search “university name intellectual property policy”.

Gifts of Collaboration

This blog post accompanies my session, Gifts of Collaboration, presented for the AIIAS Academy faculty, Silang, Philippines.

A few recommended blog posts regarding collaboration

COIL: Collaborative Online International Learning

COIL is the higher ed version of what the videoconference projects I was heavily involved in till 2011. Read more from my recent attendance at a COIL Conference where I made connections between the two:

K12 Collaboration Examples Shared

Bibliography

  • Cifuentes, L., & Murphy, K. L. (2000). Promoting multicultural understanding and positive self-concept through a distance learning community: cultural connections. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(1), 69-83.
  • Martinez, M. D., & MacMillan, G. (1998). A Joint Distance Learning Course in American Government (No. ED428005).
  • Owston, R. (2007). Contextual factors that sustain innovative pedagogical practice using technology: an international study. Journal of Educational Change, 8(1), 61-77.
  • Sweeney, M. A. (2007). The use of videoconferencing techniques which support constructivism in K-12 education. Dissertation Abstracts International.
  • Warschauer, M. (1997).Computer-mediated collaborative learning: Theory and practice. Modern Language Journal, 81(3), p. 470-481. Also at http://www.gse.uci.edu/person/markw/cmcl.html
  • Yost, N. (2001). Lights, Camera, Action: Videoconferencing in Kindergarten. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education International Conference.
  • For more videoconferencing related literature, see my research and dissertation.

Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection with Creative Professional Learning Models

This blog post accompanies my session, Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection with Creative Professional Learning Models, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

PPT: Maximizing Learning, Implementation, and Reflection

Models of Online Professional Learning

Scaffolding for Success with Large Scale

  • Cheat sheets: simple instructions with screen shots for each tool used
  • Phone numbers: who to call? tiered level of support
  • Facilitators for large groups
  • Mechanism for smalls schools to interact
  • PDF agenda, resources, instructions, handbook. Printed ahead of time.

Additional Resources

Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning: Practical Strategies & Ideas

This blog post accompanies my session, Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning: Practical Strategies & Ideas, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

PPT: Flipping Your Classroom, Personalizing Learning

Definitions

Personalized Learning

  • KnowledgeWorks: What is Personalized Learning?
  • Lim, J. (2016). Predicting successful completion using student delay indicators in undergraduate self-paced online courses. Distance Education, 37(3) , 317-332. doi:10.1080/01587919.2016.1233050
  • Lim, J. (2016). The relationship between successful completion and sequential movement in self-paced distance courses. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(1). Retrieved from http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/2167
  • Self-Directed Learning Habits
  • 4 Steps to Successful Self-Directed Learning (from a university center of teaching)
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • Lin Hsiao, J. W. D. (1998). The impact of reflective facilitation on middle school students’ self-regulated learning and their academic achievement in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. (Ph.D.), The University of Texas at Austin, United States — Texas. ProQuest Digital Dissertation database.
  • Mager, R. F., & Clark, C. (1963). Explorations in student-controlled instruction. Psychological Reports, 13(1), 71-76.
  • Panadero, E. (2017). A review of self-regulated learning: Six models and four directions for research. Frontiers in Psychology8, 422. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00422
  • Schraw, G., Crippen, K., & Hartley, K. (2006). Promoting self-regulation in science education: Metacognition as part of a broader perspective on learning. Research in Science Education, 36, 111-139. Retrieved from  doi:10.1007/s11165-005-3917-8

Video Resources

Open Courses and Resources

Recording and Hosting Videos

Assessments at the Door

Resources for Teaching, Active Learning, and Engagement

Accessibility

For Further Reading

Additional Resources

20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement

This blog post accompanies my session, 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement, presented at the 2018 Teachers’ Convention of the North American Division of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Updated PPT: 20 Tools for Significant Learning and Student Engagement (updated 8/8/18)

Note: 8/8/18 Additional links added to Learning how to Learn; and Caring

 

 

Note that I have deliberately not included tons of sites and ideas because I wanted this to be simple and not too overwhelming. To pique interest.

Learn about Designing Significant Learning Experiences

Learning How to Learn

  • Evaluating and selecting content sources, i.e. YouTube, TedEd, books!
  • Teach students to subscribe to the journal’s feeds i.e. ALT or Community of Inquiry
  • Using project based learning and makerspaces for student-designed projects
  • Teach students to monitor their own understanding (print flashcards, Quizlet), and mind map knowledge, identifying areas to learn more, selecting and pursuing
  • Reflection on their own blog, like UMW does with A Domain of One’s One
  • Showcasing and extending learning with job portfolios: i.e. via Mahara or other portfolio tools

Caring

Human Dimension

  • Blog or discuss ways in which one’s personal life affects and is affected by the subject via WordPress, VoiceThread, Weebly, Edublogs.
  • Be an ethical, responsible member of a team serving others; tools to support groups: GoogleDrive and similar tools to support collaborative learning.
  • Observation of real-life human experiences related to the content; report back to the class.

Integration

Application

  • Analyze and critique an issue or case study, and organize and present it via Padlet.
  • Apply the skills in context; document ability with video via YouTube, Videoscribe, FlipGrid, or Animoto.
  • Create a recommendation for a corporation in a real-world problem/situation, build and present on GoogleSites or PowToon.

Foundational Knowledge

  • Create and share/narrate a mental map or conceptual structure of major concepts. Bubbl.us or Mindly the app or MindMeister.
  • Create a presentation: Explain & predict concepts and ideas. i.e. Prezi
  • Have students access and interact with primary sources of content – i.e. TedEd, Library of Congress, and more.

Online Tools and References

Fink Taxonomy and Tools v2 PDF Handout – Permission granted to reprint freely. Please share any adaptations.

What would you add? Feel free to comment and share. 

 

Videoconferencing in the Real World: Wikispaces Archive

Since Wikispaces is closing down, I’m moving my collaborative videoconference projects over to my blog for archiving. Great project formats can still be used and adapted!

Videoconferencing in the Real World: A Computer Class Jigaw Project

Description: This project by Berrien RESA, is designed for 6-12th grade students studying computer technology. Students will use computer technology and distance learning to research revolutionary uses of videoconferencing in society. Students will present their research and their own innovative ideas to partner schools from around the globe.

Flyer: VCintheRealWorldFlyer09

VC Agenda

  • Brief introduction of school and projects
  • Groups introduce topic and present
  • Each presentation will include a two minute question and answer period
  • Teachers may choose to alternate presentations from school to school after every other group
  • Students may experiment with videoconference equipment
  • After all presentations and question/answer periods, students may engage in a general “getting to know you” question and answer session with their partner school

How To

Creating Posters for Videoconferencing

This VC Poster Handout for students gives simple tips for clear presentations via posters.

PowerPoint Tips

  • Use a large font.
  • Don’t put too much text on the page.
  • Don’t use red for background or text.
  • Have a good contrast between text and background.
  • Blue backgrounds with white or yellow text work best.

Preparation

  • Choose which sets you would like your students to work on
  • Divide the class into one group for each topic
  • Students will use the internet and other sources to research the following:
    • Uses of videoconferencing in their assigned area
    • Types of equipment and skills required to use videoconferencing in this area
    • Advantages and disadvantages of videoconferencing use in this area
    • Impact on environment, interpersonal skills, employment, etc.
    • Optional: Students may also add their personal opinion of videoconferencing as it relates to the above topics
  • Assign student jobs for the videoconference.
    • Have a couple students ready to introduce your class and welcome the partner class.
    • Have a couple students assigned to facilitate asking and answering questions with the partner class.

Procedures

  • Students will organize their research onto no more than 10 Power Point slides
    • Keep in mind that each group is only allotted 2-3 minutes; have students practice their presentations for fluidity, adherence to the time limit, and to answer mock questions partner schools may ask about their presentation.
    • Students should also prepare questions for their partner school’s presentations

Materials

  • Adequate access to computers with internet access and Power Point or similar tool
  • Supplementary resources
    • encyclopedias, magazine or newspaper articles, media clippings, etc.
    • Art supplies (poster paper, coloring materials, glue, etc.)

Resources for Both Classes

Note: I am not maintaining these links. They are here for reference and history only.

General Videoconferencing Information


Resources for Class A

Classroom A: Four Groups

Students: Remember your presentation cannot be longer than 3 minutes!!!

Group 1 Military Uses of VC

Group 2 Healthcare Uses of VC

Group 3 Business Uses of VC

Group 4 Dream Team
Students create a unique way to use videoconferencing that was not presented by other groups. Use your imagination and think about how videoconferencing may be used in in daily life, school, home, business, etc.

 


Resources for Class B

Classroom B: Four Groups

Group 1 Educational Uses of VC

Group 2 Uses of VC in the Judicial, Legal Systems and Public Safety

Group 3 Creative Uses of VC and Green Videoconferencing

Group 4 TV Shows, Movies and Ads
Students research and demonstrate the integration of videoconferencing in television shows, movies and commercials. Students may chose from a variety of creative formats to present their findings including skits, slide shows, video clips, etc. Reference the following link for examples:

  • Cisco TV Ads
  • Watch your favorite TV show(s) and notice if videoconferencing is used.

Standards

ISTE Standard: Communication and Collaboration
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:

  • interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.

Michigan Educational Technology Standards (METS for 6-8)

Main Standards:

  • Technology Communication Tools #1: use a variety of telecommunication tools (e.g., e-mail, discussion groups, IM, chat rooms, blogs, video-conferences, web
    conferences) or other online resources to collaborate interactively with peers, experts, and other audiences
  • Technology Communication Tools #2: create a project (e.g., presentation, web page, newsletter, information brochure) using a variety of media and formats
    (e.g., graphs, charts, audio, graphics, video) to present content information to an audience

Others also addressed:

  • Basic Operations #10: Identify technology resources that assist with various consumer-related activities (e.g., budgets, purchases, banking
    transactions, product descriptions)
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #5: discuss the societal impact of technology in the future
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #8: discuss possible uses of technology (present and future) to support personal pursuits and lifelong learning
  • Social, Ethical & Human Issues #9: identify uses of technology to support communication with peers, family, or school personnel
  • Technology Productivity Tools #2: use a variety of technology resources, including the internet, to increase learning and productivity
  • Technology Productivity Tools #3: explore basic applications that promote creativity (e.g., graphics, presentation, photo-editing, programming, video-editing)
  • Technology Research Tools #1: use a variety of Web search engines to locate information
  • Technology Research Tools #2: evaluate information from various online resources for accuracy, bias, appropriateness, and comprehensiveness

Facilitator Page

Email Confirmation Template

To: Teachers & techs on both sides, cc janine
Subject: VC in the Real World Project Confirmation: [date]

Welcome to our VC in the Real World project. The goals of this project are for your students to research and learn about videoconferencing, and experience presenting and interacting in a videoconference session.

DATE: [enter here]
TIME: [include time in both partner’s time zones]

Technical Information:
[who] will dial.
[IP address]
If there are problems, please call [phone].

Project Website:
Please visit the website for preparation information and web resources for your students to use in preparation.
http://vcinrealworld.wikispaces.com/

VC Agenda (sessions will be moderated by [name])

  1. Brief introduction of school and projects
  2. Groups introduce topic and present
  3. Each presentation will include a two minute question and answer period
  4. Teachers may choose to alternate presentations from school to school after every other group
  5. Students may experiment with videoconference equipment (presets, muting and unmuting, moving the camera, using the document camera)
  6. After all presentations and question/answer periods, students may engage in a general “getting to know you” question and answer session with their partner school

PARTNERS:
Classroom A:
[teacher name] [grade]
[school name, city, state]

Classroom B:
[teacher name] [grade]
[school name, city, state]

If you have any questions as you prepare for the videoconference, please email.

Thank you for your participation!

VC Scavenger Hunt: Wikispaces Archive

Still continuing the Wikispaces conversion and archive. Here’s a wiki that I started and didn’t finish. I’m sharing the idea here because I still think it would be so fun to design.

Videoconference Scavenger Hunt
for middle school computer classes to practice academic, technology, and videoconference skills.

We are still writing this project. The idea is that students will work in 4 groups to solve problems. Each group will have find one octet of the IP address. We’ll have 7-8 places around the world for them to dial, collect clues & solve problems, and then dial the next location, with a surprise for the students at the last location.

Turkey Trade: Wikispaces Archive

Since Wikispaces is closing down, I’m moving my collaborative videoconference projects over to my blog for archiving. Great project formats can still be used and adapted!

Project Description:
Two classroom

s will be paired up and each class will create a turkey using Turkey Trade approved materials.
The class will then write a description of their turkey and send the description to their partner class via a shared wiki page. Each class will recreate the other class’ turkey by following the directions from the shared wiki page. Both classes will meet via video conference to compare the original turkeys with the recreated turkeys.

This project will enable students to improve their descriptive writing skills, use math terms, and their ability to follow directions.


Turkey Trade Approved Materials

Paper and Such
newspaper, construction paper, bulletin board paper, paper plates, cups, shoe boxes, tissue boxes, balloons, and yarn

Markers and More
Markers, crayons, colored pencils, and scissors

Glues and Tapes
Scotch tape, duct tape, glue sticks, glue, staplers

Video Conference Agenda: (Video conference connection time is 30 minutes.)

Welcome and Introductions
Use the note-taking guide to facilitate the conversation.

  1. Classroom A zooms in on their ORIGINAL turkey.
  2. Classroom B zooms in on the second turkey they created.
  3. Classroom A identifies similarities and differences.
  4. REPEAT switching roles.
  5. Classroom B zooms in on their ORIGINAL turkey.
  6. Classroom A zooms in on the second turkey they created.
  7. Classroom B identifies similarities and differences.
  8. Closing: Big round of applause for both groups!

Be sure to stabilize the turkey when you meet with your class.

Zoom the camera in so that students can see the detail of the turkeys.


FAQ

What exactly IS Turkey Trade?

Two classrooms will be paired up and each class will create a turkey using Turkey Trade Approved Materials. 

The class will then write a description of their turkey and send the description to their partner class via email. Each class will recreate the other class’ turkey by following the emailed directions. Both classes will meet via video conference to compare the original turkeys with the recreated turkeys. This project will enable students to improve their descriptive writing skills and their ability to follow directions.

What are “turkey trade” approved materials?
Glad you asked. Here is a list of the materials to be used creating your turkey.

  • Paper and Such
    newspaper, construction paper, bulletin board paper, paper plates, cups, shoe boxes, tissue boxes, balloons, and yarn
  • Markers and More
    Markers, crayons, colored pencils, and scissors
  • Glues and Tapes
    Scotch tape, duct tape, glue sticks, glue, staplers

How do I create my turkey?
Turkeys are to be created from “Turkey Trade approved” classroom materials. Each classroom will make ONE classroom turkey and write one classroom description to share with their partner class.

How do I register for Turkey Trade?
Please register as usual.

  • Roxanne’s schools register through the Whirlidurb website. If you need a date/time that is not listed, contact Roxanne directly.
  • Janine’s schools register through the Berrien RESA website.

Who will register teachers for Turkey Trade?
It depends on each district. Contact your district site manager or building coordinator to find out who will submit registrations for your district or building.


Sample Descriptions and Tips

Teachers and coordinators:
Be sure to include size comparison, measurements, or directional words.The goal is to provide enough detail and description for the other class to create a turkey.

Examples of Measurements and Comparisons 

  • Green, almond-shaped eyes with big black pupils the size of a penny on the inside corners of the eye. Made with construction paper.
  • The diameter of the head is 2.5 pencils.
  • 12″ x 12″ tan construction paper egg-shaped head.
  • Cut a medium ( 2′ x 1′) orange rectangle out of bulletin board paper to use as the background.
  • Cut feathers out of orange, red, and yellow construction paper. There is an equal number of feathers from each color. The total number of feathers is 12 and each feather is 12 inches long.
  • The legs are like baseball bats with the fatter end connecting to the torso.
  • The waddle looks like red, wrinkly elephant skin and was made from red construction paper.

 

Example Description:

Materials: small shoe box, brown, red, orange, and yellow
construction paper, brown and red butcher paper, pattern for making
paper feathers ( any pattern will do), glue and tape

How to Construct Mr. Turkey Lurkey

  1. Cover shoe box with two sheets of brown construction paper- this is
    the turkey’s body.
  2. Cut 2 strips of brown construction 11x 1 inch. Accordion-fold and glue to bottom of box. These are the legs.
  3. Cut two wings from brown construction paper. Glue to side of box.
  4. Shape a head out of brown butcher paper. Cut a hole in the box.
  5. Stuff head down in the hole so that it sticks out above the box. Make a waddle out of red butcher paper and attach. Draw two eyes on the head.
  6. Have students trace and cut one feather each. Glue together as a fan in following pattern red, brown, orange, brown, yellow, brown etc.
  7. Attach fan to back of turkey

Standards

ISTE Technology Standard: Communication and Collaboration
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students:

  • interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
  • communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.

Michigan Language Arts
Content Standard 2: All students will demonstrate the ability to write clear and grammatically correct sentences, paragraphs, and compositions.
Content Standard 3: All students will focus on meaning and communication as they listen, speak, view, read, and write in personal, social, occupational, and civic contexts.

Michigan Math
Content Standard 1: Students experience counting and measuring activities to develop intuitive sense about numbers, develop understanding about properties of numbers, understand the need for and existence of different sets of numbers, and investigate properties of special numbers. (Concepts and Properties of Numbers)

Marzano’s Instructional Strategies That Work: Identifying Similarities and Differences
Generalizations

  1. Presenting students with explicit guidance in identifying similarities and differences enhances their understanding of and ability to use knowledge.
  2. Asking students to independently identify similarities and differences enhances their understanding of and ability to use knowledge.
  3. Representing similarities and differences in graphic or symbolic form enhances students’ understanding of and ability to use knowledge.
  4. Identification of similarities and differences can be accomplished in a variety of ways and is a highly robust activity.

Recommendations
Use these to improve your practice.

  1. Teach students to use comparing, classifying, metaphors, and analogies when they identify similarities and differences.
  2. Give students a model of the steps for engaging in the process.
  3. Use a familiar context to teach students these steps.
  4. Have students use graphic organizers as a visual tool to represent the similarities and differences.
  5. Guide students as they engage in this process. Gradually give less structure and less guidance (Pitler, et al., 2007, p. 168).

VC Evaluation

This Google Form was used to evaluate the project.


Facilitator Info

Site Check in for connections

  1. Tech check audio/video
  2. Can they move the camera?
  3. Zoom in the cameras on the turkeys.
  4. Do they have the printed agenda?
  5. Do they know who is Teacher A/Teacher B? (Teacher A shows ORIGINAL turkey first. Teacher B shows the second turkey they made. Then switch.)
  6. Any questions?

First Email (send as soon as they are partnered)

Turkey Trade ’10: First Steps

Thank you for registering to participate in Whirlidurb’s Turkey Trade ’10. We will keep you updated as the project develops.

Project Website:
Frequently Asked Questions:
YOUR DATE & TIME is:

For Teachers:

  1. Go watch the Approved Materials video:
  2. Start making your first turkey. Here are some examples:
  3. Review the sample descriptions and tips:
  4. Your description needs to be posted online by November 16.
  5. Check the Participating Classes page for the current schedule and partner information:

For Coordinators:

  1. Schedule and connection details will be posted online by November 11.
  2. You might have to help some of your teachers post their descriptions online by 16th.

Let us know if you have any questions.

Roxanne Glaser, Whirlidurb
Janine Lim, Berrien RESA

2nd Email (sent 11/10 in 2010)
~Turkey Trade 2010: How to Post Descriptions~

Next steps for Turkey Trade 2010
We are delighted to have all of you participating this year!

Project Website:
Frequently Asked Questions:

How to Post Descriptions Online
You do NOT have to create an account to edit the wiki description pages.

  1. Review the sample descriptions and tips:
  2. Make sure your description has enough detail and description for the other class to create a turkey.
  3. Go to:
  4. Find your name on the schedule and click the “Post Descriptions Here” link for your name.
  5. Look at the names on the page, make sure you see your name at the top.
  6. Click EDIT
  7. Select the text “Paste your description here” and delete it.
  8. Copy your description and paste it below your contact information.
  9. Click SAVE. Make sure you save your work.

A video on how to post your descriptions online is at the bottom of the page here:

TEACHERS:

  1. Find your partner, date, and time for videoconference connection here:and post your description online by Tuesday, November 16
  2. Get the description that your partner class wrote by clicking on the name of your partner here:
  3. Make a SECOND turkey using the written descriptions from your partner. Do not exchange photos or post pictures. We are using the written descriptions to try to make a match. The videoconference is when we will see if they match.

COORDINATORS:

  1. We are working on adding connection details to the schedule:
  2. These calls will be bridged by Berrien RESA and Whirlidurb. The final connection information will be added to the wiki by next Tuesday.
  3. Test calls (if needed) will be this Friday, November 12.

Let us know if you need help!
Your Turkey Trade 2010 Team
Janine Lim, Berrien RESA
Roxanne Glaser, Whirlidurb

subject: — Turkey Trade Descriptions Due Today —
sent to all teachers and coordinators

===Reminder====
Turkey Trade descriptions need to be posted today.

If you are having trouble posting, contact your VC coordinator or one of us for assistance.

If you cannot post your description today, email your partner teacher and copy rglaser@whirlidurb.com and janine.lim@berrienresa.org on the message.

You can find your partner’s email address on this page:

How to Edit the Wiki Video
If you need help with editing the wiki, watch the 2nd video on this page.

What to Do During the Videoconference
The 3rd video on this page explains what to do during the videoconference.

Let us know if you need help!

Your Turkey Trade 2010 Team
Janine Lim, Berrien RESA
Roxanne Glaser, Whirlidurb

Subject: Last Details for Turkey Trade Nov. 19-23

This message has been sent to all Turkey Trade teachers and coordinators.=

All the descriptions are posted now! Great work everyone!

Turkey Trade Connections:

  • Berrien RESA is bridging all the Turkey Trade connections this year. You can see the connection details on the Participating Classes page:
  • READ the connection notes on the schedule carefully and ask questions if you don’t understand or need assistance.

Teachers: Prepare for the Videoconference

  • Prepare your students for the videoconference connection by assigning them jobs to do. Also, practice with them on how to identify similarities and differences.
  • The third training video on this page explains what will happen during the videoconference.
  • Videoconference connections last for 30 minutes.
  • Print the Day of the Videoconference sheet and for grades 2-6, print the student note taking guide: (Scroll down, it’s above the 3rd video)

If at any time during this project, you don’t understand how something works or why it is done that way, contact one of us immediately and we will assist you!

Your Turkey Trade 2010 Team
Janine Lim, Berrien RESA
Roxanne Glaser, Whirlidurb

Turkey Trade 2010 Project Evaluation
Thank you so much for a GREAT Turkey Trade. We had 20 classes participate this year from Texas and Michigan. It is always amazing to see the creations and the matches.

= T H A N K Y O U = = =
To the TEACHERS: I appreciate all of the organization, hard work, creativity, and flexibility that you bring to the project. Those of us behind the scenes are truly amazed at what you do with students! The creativity and higher order thinking skills that students were used was impressive.

To the COORDINATORS: Those of us who work in videoconferencing know that it can be a scary, intimidating technology, you are one of the keys to our technical success.

= PROJECT EVALUATION = = =
Each year we ask for feedback so that we can improve the project for the next year. Please take a couple of minutes to let us know how you used the Turkey Trade Project to teach or reinforce certain curricular concepts.

Thank you!

Your Turkey Trade 2010 Team
Janine Lim, Berrien RESA
Roxanne Glaser, Whirlidurb